real property

get off my property.
Apr 18
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This is McKinney’s Consolidated Laws of New York Annotated (this single volume is the New York Eminent Domain Procedure Law or EDPL for short). The whole series is like 100 volumes. McKinney’s is a digest, which means it includes the entire text of the statute accompanied by short summaries of and references to court cases that interpret the statute, which summaries are prepared by the Editor (in New York’s case McKinney, who is dead like Robert Ludlum or Stephen King). Before Westlaw and Lexis launched online research platforms, law firms could only research law by subscribing to a series like this (usually leasing the volumes because the cost of purchase is prohibitive and really not worth incurring). Subscription gets you the books and the annual ‘pocket part’ (Diptic Right, above) which updates the digest with cases decided since the last hard bound volumes were printed (now 10 years ago) and the law librarian discards the old pocket part to make room for the new one. It’s still cheaper for a New York law firm to subscribe than let its attorneys look up NY law online. If you wanted to read the cases, you had to subscribe to the Reporter of Decisions for your region/jurisdiction, which can fill whole rooms. Reporters are the books behind the personal injury lawyers on TV.

This is McKinney’s Consolidated Laws of New York Annotated (this single volume is the New York Eminent Domain Procedure Law or EDPL for short). The whole series is like 100 volumes. McKinney’s is a digest, which means it includes the entire text of the statute accompanied by short summaries of and references to court cases that interpret the statute, which summaries are prepared by the Editor (in New York’s case McKinney, who is dead like Robert Ludlum or Stephen King). Before Westlaw and Lexis launched online research platforms, law firms could only research law by subscribing to a series like this (usually leasing the volumes because the cost of purchase is prohibitive and really not worth incurring). Subscription gets you the books and the annual ‘pocket part’ (Diptic Right, above) which updates the digest with cases decided since the last hard bound volumes were printed (now 10 years ago) and the law librarian discards the old pocket part to make room for the new one. It’s still cheaper for a New York law firm to subscribe than let its attorneys look up NY law online. If you wanted to read the cases, you had to subscribe to the Reporter of Decisions for your region/jurisdiction, which can fill whole rooms. Reporters are the books behind the personal injury lawyers on TV.

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